Wednesday, August 11, 2010

ETHNIC RELATIONS, Race and Ethnic Relations

Race and Ethnic Relations
Mc Nair Scholars Summer Program 2004


Professor: Gilda L. Ochoa
Office: Hahn 220 at 420 N. Harvard Ave. (Pomona College)
Phone: (909) 607-2604
e-mail: gochoa@pomona.edu


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Course Description:
This seminar focuses on the historical and contemporary patterns of race and ethnic relations. We will review some of the key sociological perspectives and works on race and ethnicity. As well as assessing authors' arguments, research methods, findings, and policy implications, we will consider topics such as racial/ethnic identity formation, white supremacy, acculturation and assimilation, the interlocking systems of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, intra-ethnic relations, race and ethnicity in schools, political activism, and possibilities for change.


Throughout the course, we will endeavor to answer several questions: What explains racial and ethnic stratification? What is the contemporary significance of race and ethnicity in the United States? How have various racial and ethnic groups interacted with each other? What are the possibilities for change?


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Required Readings:

Almaguer, Tomas. Racial Fault Lines: The Historical Origins of White Supremacy in California. Berkeley and Los Angeles, California: University of California Press, 1994.

Ochoa, Gilda. Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community: Power, Conflict, and Solidarity. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004.

Tatum, Beverly Daniel. "Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" And Other Conversations About Race. New York: Basic Books, 1997.

Tuan, Mia. Forever Foreigners or Honorary Whites? The Asian Ethnic Experience Today. New Brunswick: New Jersey, 1998.


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Course Requirements and Grading:

All of the materials presented in this course are required. You are expected to use all of the information available to make points, arguments, and comparisons in your assignments and course discussions.

The grading for the course will be as follows:


Class Participation 20%
Reflection Paper (3-4 pages) 20%
Book Review (4-5 pages) 25%
Final Paper (5-6 pages) 35%


Your final grade will be based on the following:

1. Class Participation - The sharing, exchanging, and appreciation of people's ideas and experiences are part of the process that builds critical thinking skills. Hence, class participation is required, since much of the class will be interactice (as opposed to one-way lecture). Class participation includes contributing verbally to the discussion as well as listening actively. You are expected to come with the readings completed and prepared to discuss. This is a class that "works" with the active participation of everyone.

Group Facilitations - You You will work in groups of 5-6 to prepare and facilitate a class discussion on one of the following course books. Each group should prepare a typed list of questions to be distributed to all of the members of the class at the beginning of the discussion. These questions should be based on the reading and might include inquiries about the author's arguments, data and the significance of the research findings. Facilitations should be designed for 75-90 minutes.

"Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" June 28
Forever Foreigners or Honorary Whites? July 19
Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community July 26

Current Issues/Special Events - To structure into the course a discussion of current issues regarding race and ethnicity locally, nationally, and internationally, you are encouraged to introduce and discuss a current issue at least once during the course.

2. Papers

Reflection Paper - You will be asked to submit one 3-4 page typed reflection paper. The topic for this paper is included in the course schedule and is due at the beginning of class on June 30. Papers will be evaluated on their structure, thoughtfulness, insight, and engagement with course material.

Book Review - Select one of the course books, and write a 4-5 page book review. The guidelines for the review will be discussed in class. This review will be due on the last scheduled day that the book will be discussed in class.

Formal Paper - At the end of the couse, you will be asked to write on 5-6 page typed analytical paper.

Grades on all late papers will be impacted.

WEEK 1: Introduction

June 23 - Introduction to the Course: Building the Foundation
Topics: Critical Pedagogy; The Politics of Education; Making Connections; Coalition Building and Creating a Democratic Classroom; Distinguishing Between Individual, Organizational, and Structural Discrimination; Individual Prejudics and Exclusionary Ideologies; White Priviledge
Read: Tatum, Beverly Daniel. "Why Are All of the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" pp. ix-xix, 3-28 and 193-206.

June 25 - Breaking the Taboo: Talking About Race and Racism
Topics: Cooley and the Looking Glass Self; Raising Resisters; School and the Identity Formation
Read: Tatum, Beverly Daniel. "Why Are All of the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" pp. 18-90.

Sign-Up for Group Facilitations
Discuss Facilitations and Book Reviews

June 27 - Book Reading of Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community (Puente Hills Mall, City of Industry 1:00-2:00)



WEEK 2: Racial/Ethnic Identity Formation

June 28
Read: Tatum, Beverly Daniel. "Why Are All of the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" pp.93-190.

First Group Facilitation
Book Review Due, If Writing on "Why Are All of the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?"

June 30 - Sociological Perspective on Race and Ethnicity
Topics: Assimilationist- Straight Line Theory of Assimilation, Stages of Assimilation (Behavioral and Structural Assimilation); Anglo-Conformity: Cultural Deficiency; The Significance of Class on Group Position; What Explains Contemporary Race/Ethnic Relations and Inequality?

Read: Pincus, Fred L. and Howard J. Ehrlich. "Discrimination, Economic Restructuring, and Underclass Culture." In Race and Ethnic Conflict, eds. Fred L. Pincus and Howard J. Ehrlich. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1999.

Gordon, Milton. "Assimilation in America." In Majority and Minority, ed. Norman Yetman. Boston, Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon, Inc., 1975.

Harrison, Lawrence E. "How Cultural Values Shape Economic Success." In Race and Ethnic Conflict, eds. Fred L. Pincus and Howard J. Ehrlich. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1994.

Wilson, William Julius. "Societal Changes and Vulnerable Neighborhoods." In Race and Ethnic Conflict, eds. Fred L. Pincus and Howard J. Ehrlich. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1994.

Bonaich, Edna. "Inequality in America." In Sources, eds. Adalberto Aguirre, Jr. and David V. Baker. Guilford, Connecticut: Dushkin/McGraw-Hill, 1998.

Due: 3-4 Page Reflection Paper on the following. What do you think explains race/ethnic relations and inequality? do you agree and/or disagree with any of the perspective offered in today's readings?



WEEK 3: Sociological Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity
July 7
Topics: The Social Construction of Race; The Rule of Hypodescent; Challenging Binaries; The Simultaneity of Race, Class, and Gender; Problemizing Conceptions of Racial/Ethnic Authenticity; Multiple and Multiracial Identities

Read: Omi, Michael and Harold Winant. "Racial Formations." In Sources, eds. Adalberto Aguirre, Jr. and David V. Baker. Guilford, Connecticut: The Dushkin Publishing Group, Inc., 1995.

Espiritu, Yen L. "Race, Gender, Class in the Lives of Asian Americans." In Race, Gender, and Class, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1997, 12-19.

Moraga, Cherrie. "La Guerra." In Race, Class, and Gender, eds. Margaret L. Anderson and Patricia Hill Collins. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1998.

Sacks, Karen Brodkin. "How Did Jews Become White Folks?" In Race, eds. Steven Gregory and Roger Sanjek. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1994.

Oliver, Melvin L. and Thomas M. Shapiro. "Black Wealth/White Wealth." In Mapping the Social Landscape, ed. Susan J. Ferguson. Mountain View, CA: McGraw Hill, 2002.

July 9 - Historical Origins on the Development of Racism
Topics: Racial Hierarchy; The Significance of Structural Factors and Popular Ideologies (Manifest Destiny and Free Labor) on Race/Ethnic Relations

Read: Almaguer, Tomas. Racial Fault Lines, pp. 1-41 and 205-213.

Video: "Ishi: The Last of the Yahi" (Producers/Directors: Jeff Riffe and Pamela Roberts, 55 minutes, 1994.)



WEEK 4: Historical Perspectives on the Development of Racism
July 12 - Historical Origins
Topic: According to Almaguer, what in particular explains differing experiences and different group positions on the racial hierarchy of 19th century California?

Read: Almaguer, Tomas. Racial Fault Lines, pp. 45-204.
a.) "The True Significance of the Word 'White,'" pp.45-74
"The Ravages of Time and the Intrusion of Modern American Civilization," pp. 75-104
b.) "Before the march of Civilization He Must Give Way," pp. 107-130
"Unfit and Incapable of Being Associated with Whites on Any Terms of Equality," pp. 131-150
c.) "They Can Be Hired in Masses; They Can Be Controlled Like Unthinking Slaves," pp. 153-204.

Small Group Discussions
Book Review Due, If Writing on Racial Fault Lines

July 14

Read: Tuan, Mia. Forever Foreigners or Honorary Whites?, pp. 1-75.

Video: "Who Killed Vincent Chin?"



WEEK 5
July 19

Read: Tuan, Mia. Forever Foreigners or Honorary Whites?, pp. 76-167.

Second Group Facilitation
Book Review Due, If Writing on Forever Foreigners or Honorary Whites?

July 21 - Intra-Ethnic Relations

Read: Ochoa, Gilda L. Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community, pp. 1-97.

Video: "Fear and Learning at Hoover Elementary"



WEEK 6
July 26 - Politics and Change

Read: Ochoa, Gilda L. Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community, pp. 98-175.

Third Group Facilitation

July 28 - Politics and Change

Read: Ochoa, Gilda L. Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community, pp. 176-236.

Guerrero, Jaimes M.A. "Exemplars of Indigenism." In Women Transforming Politics, eds. Cathy J. Cohen, Kathleen B. Jones, and Joan C. Tronto. New Yorl: New York University Press, 1997.

Salz, Arthur and Julius Trubowitz. "It Was All of Us Working Together." In Race and Ethnic Conflict, eds. Fred L. Pincus and Howard J. Ehrlich. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1999.

Jaret, Charels. "Changing the Whole System." In Race and Ethnic Conflict, eds. Fred L. Pincus and Howard J. Ehrlich. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1999.

Final Paper Due
Book Review Due, If Writing on Becoming Neighbors in a Mexican American Community

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